February 11, 2002

The Tony Kornheiser Show resumed it’s open-mic Internet broadcasting today after being silenced several weeks ago. “What’s heard here, stays here.” – Tony Kornheiser, upon declaring the Internet-show’s return at 10:26 a.m. ET, on Feb. 11, 2002. Why does this matter? Well first…a little background. I late 2001, many Internet broadcasts of radio shows were in a state of limbo. Court rulings and fears of having to pay royalties on advertising meant many broadcasters temporarily pulled the plug. ESPN Radio was among few broadcasters that resumed its Internet broadcasts, but the shows went silent during the commercial breaks. Washington Post columnist (and now co-host of ESPN’s Pardon The Interruption) Tony Kornheiser decided to give Internet listeners of his show a treat by leaving the studio microphones open during the commercial breaks. The Tony Kornheiser Show‘s Internet radio show quickly became gonzo radio at its best. You heard what they really thought about the world of sports, entertainment, and the politics of the day. You heard real people with real emotions. The show was especially poignant during the aftermath of the 9/11 terrorist attacks because the show is based out of Washington, D.C.. The transitions between the on-air and off-air commentary were seamless. It was radio as it was meant to be. A very personal conversation with the audience. Unfortunately, not everyone approved of some of the off-air remarks. On January 4, 2002 it was alleged that “racist” remarks were made during one of the breaks, and some heat was applied to ESPN Radio to pull the plug. (Not that it justifies it, but the off-air remarks were said by Kevin Stanfield, who himself is an African-American.) Needless to say, Tony Kornheiser “chose” to pull the plug on the Internet radio show for an indefinite period of time. Well, as of today it’s back on the air…and it’s a good thing too. This is the kind of stuff that makes the Internet worth using. This is meaningful content. You get the whole show…three hours with Mr. Tony as I like to call it. And you know what…I’d pay for it if I had to. Have a listen here…. [Saltire News]

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February 11, 2002

From The Coffee Geek.

Just remember, the coffee bean is nature’s most complex natural foodstuff. Over 3,000 chemical components between the green and roasted bean, and some
800 of them directly responsible for taste and flavour (source, Andrea and Dr. Ernesto Illy: Espresso, the Chemistry of Quality). By comparison, a fine red wine has about 300 identifiable components that contribute to taste. And it’s nature’s (and man’s) second most complex food item. If you ever wondered why ‘coffee flavoured’ isn’t exactly coffee flavoured, the above numbers are why.

[C:\PIRILLO.EXE]


February 11, 2002

From The Coffee Geek.

Just remember, the coffee bean is nature’s most complex natural foodstuff. Over 3,000 chemical components between the green and roasted bean, and some
800 of them directly responsible for taste and flavour (source, Andrea and Dr. Ernesto Illy: Espresso, the Chemistry of Quality). By comparison, a fine red wine has about 300 identifiable components that contribute to taste. And it’s nature’s (and man’s) second most complex food item. If you ever wondered why ‘coffee flavoured’ isn’t exactly coffee flavoured, the above numbers are why.

[C:\PIRILLO.EXE]


February 11, 2002

14669 » February 11 8:45 AM. The America-Hating British? In the UK’s Spectator : “And this time it’s not just the usual America-haters at the Guardian and the BBC, but the likes of Alice Thomson, Stephen Glover, Alasdair Palmer, Matthew Parris, my most esteemed Telegraph and Speccie colleagues…many people over here had no idea quite how ridiculous you are. You’re shocked by us, we’re laughing at you. In fairness, instead of coasting on non-existent diseases and wild guesses at the weather, the always elegant Matthew Parris at least attempted to expand Guantanamo into a general thesis. ‘We seek to project the message that there are rules to which all nations are subject,’ he wrote in the Times. ‘America has a simpler message: kill Americans, and you’re dead meat.’ This caused endless amusement over here. As the Internet wag Steven den Beste commented, ‘By George, I think he’s got it!….’ PS What is an internet wag anyway? [MetaFilter]


February 11, 2002

14669 » February 11 8:45 AM. The America-Hating British? In the UK’s Spectator : “And this time it’s not just the usual America-haters at the Guardian and the BBC, but the likes of Alice Thomson, Stephen Glover, Alasdair Palmer, Matthew Parris, my most esteemed Telegraph and Speccie colleagues…many people over here had no idea quite how ridiculous you are. You’re shocked by us, we’re laughing at you. In fairness, instead of coasting on non-existent diseases and wild guesses at the weather, the always elegant Matthew Parris at least attempted to expand Guantanamo into a general thesis. ‘We seek to project the message that there are rules to which all nations are subject,’ he wrote in the Times. ‘America has a simpler message: kill Americans, and you’re dead meat.’ This caused endless amusement over here. As the Internet wag Steven den Beste commented, ‘By George, I think he’s got it!….’ PS What is an internet wag anyway? [MetaFilter]


February 11, 2002

14661 » February 11 2:56 AM. The world of the laid-off techie. “Human resource experts say the underemployment trend in the current economic cycle is just starting to emerge. Many workers got the ax when mass layoffs peaked in the summer and fall of 2001, and they coasted on several months of severance and unemployment insurance, which generally lasts six months. With the tech job market still in the doldrums, they’re now considering new gigs as waitresses, bartenders, forklift drivers or baby sitters–anything to pay the rent. ” I wish the media hadn’t/didn’t focus so much attention on the suits who seem to only be able to “fail upwards” versus the folks in the trenches. (via /.) [MetaFilter]


February 11, 2002

14661 » February 11 2:56 AM. The world of the laid-off techie. “Human resource experts say the underemployment trend in the current economic cycle is just starting to emerge. Many workers got the ax when mass layoffs peaked in the summer and fall of 2001, and they coasted on several months of severance and unemployment insurance, which generally lasts six months. With the tech job market still in the doldrums, they’re now considering new gigs as waitresses, bartenders, forklift drivers or baby sitters–anything to pay the rent. ” I wish the media hadn’t/didn’t focus so much attention on the suits who seem to only be able to “fail upwards” versus the folks in the trenches. (via /.) [MetaFilter]


February 8, 2002

Unknown. “Don’t use a big word where a diminutive one will suffice.” [Quotes of the Day]


February 8, 2002

Unknown. “Don’t use a big word where a diminutive one will suffice.” [Quotes of the Day]


February 7, 2002

Glimpse of the future. In an age when movie musicals are mostly children’s cartoons, Baz Luhrmann’s “Moulin Rouge” brilliantly reinvents the genre and opens the door to a new cinematic style. So why didn’t the critics get it? [Salon.com]